Unions to ask Nissan why the Barcelona Plant will close again October

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Unions to ask Nissan bosses why the plant will close again in October. image: Twitter

As Nissan in Barcelona reopens on Monday Unions still have no idea why it will close again in October.

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Union sources have revealed that the reasons for the closure are unknown and that they intend to ask the car manufacturer for explanations at a meeting to be held this Monday.

Nissan had marked August 24 on the calendar to resume activity in its plants in Barcelona, ​​but with the absence of Acciona Facility Services – the main subcontracted company with more than 500 workers in the Free Zone – the Japanese manufacturer was forced to delay the return to production for another week.

Workers at the Nissan plant in Barcelona take strike action over closures. image: Twitter

The Acciona Facility Services workers had announced this Tuesday that they will go on an indefinite strike to demand the same rights as those obtained by their colleagues with the Japanese multinational after the company put a proposal on the table that Nissan did not want to accept: “The lack of response and lack of definition that has led the workers to an unsustainable situation, which makes it unfeasible to maintain the activity under the conditions in which the Japanese firm intends”. Explained sources from the subcontractor.


After a marathon 25-hour meeting, the Japanese multinational Nissan and unions had recently reached an agreement for the factories in Barcelona, this was after Nissan announced earlier this year in May that ​the plant would be closed in a move which would affect the jobs of 2,525 workers.

The factory will now resume activity this Monday on Line 1, in charge of assembling the 100% electric van e-NV200, but said it will stop again at the beginning of October, said a spokesman for the company.


Nissan car production in Spain to close as the company announces an increase in production in Africa.

Nissan Motor Co aims to launch seven new models in Africa over the next two years, company executives said on Monday, as the Japanese automaker seeks to focus on high-growth markets to try to weather the impact of the COVID-19 crisis.

The company announced a plan last month to cut the number of models it makes globally and to improve efficiency after the pandemic triggered its first annual loss in 11 years.




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