Alcudia, a jewel in the north

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A beach scene Alcudia.

TRACING its history back more than 2,000 years, Alcudia is a very special town which appeals to nature lovers for both its 30 kilometre coastline and the fact that it has determined that it will be an area of conservation and environmental protection.

This has not been a trendy knee jerk reaction to recent events but for more than 20 years, the council has been promoting the need to protect the local environment and awards an Environmental Quality Label in recognition to those tourist establishments with a strong commitment towards the environment.

The main aim is to encourage those involved with tourism to look after the town by reducing waste, sorting its rubbish, using recycled material and ecological products, reducing electrical consumption, to eliminate noise, and to show environmental, cultural and linguistic respect.

This is not just good for the town but also encourages tourists who value the fact that the town goes out of its way to protect its environment thus generating valuable income for the tourist industry.

It is a large resort popular with families with most of the hotels located in Port d’Alcudia and Platja d’Alcudia. Although the main town boasts buildings dating back to the 13th century, the main industry was agriculture until tourism started in a small way in the 1920s, staying that way until the 1970s when there was a flurry of building which meant that the town became one of the major attractions on the Island.

There was however significant investment in the 1950s in improving the electrical supply by the building of a thermal power station as well as an extension of the commercial harbour.

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The Bay of Alcudia.

Building has been controlled but there is the requisite golf course and some agricultural land has been lost, but the town still retains much of its medieval charm whilst still offering today’s tourists good quality accommodation and leisure facilities.

Hiking and bicycle holidays are well patronised and the marina at Port d’Alcudia sees many restaurants open during the summer season.

Bird watching is popular and like so many towns and villages in Spain, Alcudia enjoys a very popular feria as well as regular markets, musical events, exhibitions and even a firework display.

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The City Gates of Alcudia.

The town has even become the centre for the Mallorca Iron Man competition where hundreds of athletes undertake a 2.4-mile (3.86km) swim, a 112-mile (180.25km) bicycle ride and a marathon 26.2-mile (42.16km) run, raced in that order and without any break.

As a town which attracts so many visitors it has managed to retain its natural charm and historic past whilst welcoming visitors to enjoy all that it has to offer.

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