Malaga hospital to pay almost 174,000 euros in compensation to patient for medical negligence

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Malaga hospital to pay almost 174,000 euros in compensation to patient for medical negligence
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A hospital in Malaga has been ordered to pay almost 174,000 euros in compensation to a patient who underwent eye surgery to eliminate the use of glasses but ended up with even worse eyesight.

A hospital in Malaga has been ordered to pay a patient 173,599 euros in compensation for the aftereffects of a surgical intervention that he underwent in order to stop having to use glasses.

The 54-year-old patient was short-sighted and decided to undergo surgery in order to stop having to use glasses, following a pre-operation evaluation, on July 29, 2000.

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Even though he had been told that he would no longer need glasses and would recover his vision after one operation, he was still short-sighted, so he underwent surgery a second time on November 29 of the same year.

The patient began to lose his eyesight alarmingly over the years following the surgery, and on August 31, 2007, he went back to the hospital and was advised to go to another ophthalmological centre so that the cause could be determined.

In March 2008, the patient went to the Marcos Optical Institute, where he was diagnosed with corneal ectasia as a direct result of the LASIK eye surgery.


San José Obrero Centre and Virgen de la Victoria Hospital confirmed the damage and the diagnosis.

The hospital had failed to mention the possible risk of corneal ectasia before the first operation and provided absolutely no information about risks before the second.

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