Brexit: Van drivers will need new operating licences to enter EU from May

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Brexit: Van drivers will need new operating licences to enter EU from May
Brexit: Van drivers will need new operating licences to enter EU from May. image: Wikipedia

Van drivers will need to get new international operating licences to travel to and from the EU next year due to Brexit.

Van drivers will need to get new international operating licences to travel to and from the EU next year due to Brexit red tape, the government has announced.

This will come into force in May 2022, as well as more checks at Dover and other ports that were postponed in 2021 because of the UK’s lack of preparation for Brexit.

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The gov.uk website states that anyone driving a van, light commercial vehicle or any car towing a trailer will have to have a “goods vehicle operator licence” to enter the EU, Iceland, Norway, Liechtenstein or Switzerland.

The licence will cost up to £1,100 which, industry leaders say, is a significant cost for solo operators.

Drivers will have to pay £257 for an application fee and a further £401 for the licence. They will also have to pay a £401 “continuation fee” to keep the licence.


Rod McKenzie, the managing director of policy and public affairs at the RHA, said: “This is just more bureaucracy. It’s been flagged for some time but could be a problem for the one-man bands or small operators who are simply too busy running their business day to day to have noticed this.”

Drivers will also be required to assign a member of staff, or themselves, as a “transport manager.” This has to be a named individual that makes sure industry regulations and tax payments in the EU are adhered to.

The person has to either prove they have managed fleets of vehicles for 10 years or more, or they will have to take a course to qualify as a transport manager.


Hauliers will face a list of other rules from January 1 when EU exporters have to register for a goods vehicle movement service (GVMS) when customs controls will apply to any goods moving between the EU and UK.

Hauliers who fail to provide the paperwork will not be allowed to board a ferry or shuttle.

McKenzie said: “Brexit was challenging initially for hauliers with loads delayed and lots of frustration but as ever with logistics, people have found their way. The big challenge for 2022 is how ready our EU counterparts will be for entry into GB.”


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Laura is from a small seaside town in North Wales and has also lived in Liverpool and Manchester, where she studied English Literature and worked in social media and marketing. Laura moved to the city of Zaragoza last August to teach English, but after missing the coast she decided to move to beautiful Nerja to enjoy the sun and sea. Laura has a passion for animals, films, outdoor activities, writing and the environment.

1 COMMENT

  1. Does this include motorhome? I am partially disabled and our motorhome gives us the freedom to be able to holiday in France and other parts of Europe (until Covid, of course!). Is this freedom now being taken away from us and thousands like us who could never manage to follow all these rules?

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