A third of Spain is forest

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FOREST: Spain's forest area has grown 33 per cent since 1990. Photo: Shutterstock

SPAIN is ranked 76th in the world by forest area with 36.94 per cent of the country covered by forests.

And according to the World Bank data, Spain’s forest area has grown 33 per cent since 1990 rising from 27.65 per cent in 1990 to 36.9 per cent in 2016.

Suriname is the country with the largest area of woodland in the world, with about 98 per cent of its territory covered in forest, followed by Micronesia (91.86 per cent), Gabon (90.04 per cent) and Seychelles (88.41 per cent).

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Within the EU and ahead of Spain, the first country to appear in the list is Finland, at number 10, with 73.11 per cent of forest territory, in 16th place is Sweden (68.92 per cent), in 23rd is Slovenia (61.97 per cent), in 36th, Estonia (53.98 per cent) and in 51st place is Austria (46.91 per cent).

On the other hand, three countries in the world have no forest area at all: San Marino, Qatar and Nauru. In addition, those with the smallest percentage of their territory occupied by forest cover are Oman (0.1 per cent), Egypt (0.07 per cent) and Libya (0.12 per cent).


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Tara Rippin is a reporter for Spain’s largest English-speaking newspaper, Euro Weekly News, and is responsible for the Costa Blanca region.
She has been in journalism for more than 20 years, having worked for local newspapers in the Midlands, UK, before relocating to Spain in 1990.
Since arriving, the mother-of-one has made her home on the Costa Blanca, while spending 18 months at the EWN head office in Fuengirola on the Costa del Sol.
She loves being part of a community that has a wonderful expat and Spanish mix, and strives to bring the latest and most relevant news to EWN’s loyal and valued readers.

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