Volkswagen built cars may not have secure locks

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Photo Credit Andreas Praefcke Wikimedia
Volkswagen factory Wolfsburg Germany

AS IF the Volkswagen group hasn’t received enough negative publicity over the past year, a research paper which has just been presented at a cybersecurity conference  in Texas suggests that many cars produced by the group since 1995 can be unlocked by hackers with a very cheap piece of electronic equipment and a knowledge of digital keys.

There are two different methods by which there cars which include Audi, Seat and Skodas can be opened remotely according to researchers at the University of Birmingham and a German firm Kasper & Oswald.

Prior to the publication of the research, the authors informed VW and agreed not to reveal the entire secret of the hacking which they had successfully done themselves and also will be working with the car manufacturer to try to assist in remedying the weakness in the cyber keys.

It appears that many of the most recent generation of VW produced models are invulnerable to the hacking and it would not be possible to start any of the cars, but easy access to any motor car lessens the chance of a thief being caught removing property.

According to the German research company, there is a range of other models produced by a number of different manufacturers which are similarly vulnerable and whilst matters can be easily resolved for future models, it could well be that control units in older cars would need to be replaced at considerable cost to either the manufacturers or the driving public in order to remedy the problem.

 AS IF the Volkswagen group hasn’t received enough negative publicity over the past year, a research paper which has just been presented at a cybersecurity conference  in Texas suggests that many cars produced by the group since 1995 can be unlocked by hackers with a very cheap piece of electronic equipment and a knowledge of digital keys.

There are two different methods by which there cars which include Audi, Seat and Skodas can be opened remotely according to researchers at the University of Birmingham and a German firm Kasper & Oswald.

Prior to the publication of the research, the authors informed VW and agreed not to reveal the entire secret of the hacking which they had successfully done themselves and also will be working with the car manufacturer to try to assist in remedying the weakness in the cyber keys.

It appears that many of the most recent generation of VW produced models are invulnerable to the hacking and it would not be possible to start any of the cars, but easy access to any motor car lessens the chance of a thief being caught removing property.

According to the German research company, there is a range of other models produced by a number of different manufacturers which are similarly vulnerable and whilst matters can be easily resolved for future models, it could well be that control units in older cars would need to be replaced at considerable cost to either the manufacturers or the driving public in order to remedy the problem.

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