Je suis Charlie! First anniversary of the attack on Charlie Hebdo

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© Ekaterina Pokrovsky / Shutterstock
Shrine to those who died.

IT WAS on January 7 last year that two brothers, Said and Cherif Kouachi, armed with deadly assault rifles, stormed the offices of the satirical weekly paper Charlie Hebdo, killing 11 people and wounding another 11 in the start of a three day general attack on France.

The brothers, who said that they were representing a branch of the Al-Qaeda terror group, killed a police officer as they left the newspaper building in Paris and were subject to a major manhunt, which resulted in a shootout with police on January where both were shot dead.

At the same time, a French born man of Malian descent, Amedy Coulibaly, had also commenced attacks on random targets which ended with the shooting of four Jewish customers at a kosher supermarket as part of an overall total of five fatalities and 11 woundings before he was also shot by police who stormed the supermarket.

On January 11, more than 40 world leaders joined with a huge number of mourners in Paris to show their support for the French people as part of a day of national unity throughout France, whilst the  phrase Je suis Charlie as a means of protest against terrorism and threats swept across the world.

Sadly, the events of November 13 in Paris, with the massacre of 130 innocent people by jihadists, showed the constant vulnerability of any city when chosen as a target for terrorism.

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